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Predictors of help-seeking intentions for mental illness symptoms among minority-UK mothers

Predictors of help-seeking intentions for mental illness symptoms among minority-UK mothers

Overview

Partake in a 30-minute survey designed to assess what influences intentions to seek help for perinatal mental illness.

  • 30 Minute
  • Research Participant
  • Participate

Taking Part

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Aim

Research examining factors that enhance help-seeking intentions is limited among minoritised ethnic communities. Minoritised ethnic groups consist of anyone that is not White British; this includes, Asian or Asian British, Black, Black British, Caribbean or African, Mixed or multiple ethnic groups, Arab, White Other (e.g., American/Australian and anyone of European descent) and any other ethnic groups. Gypsy, Roma and Irish groups who live in the UK are also classed as ethnic minorities.

Help-seeking intention is defined as the intent to seek help for physical and/or mental health illness from trusted people in the community such as mental health professionals. Researchers are interested in understanding what influences decisions to seek professional help for perinatal anxiety and depression symptoms among women and birthing people who are either pregnant or have given birth in the last 12 months in the UK, who belong to a minoritised ethnic group. Specifically, they aim to investigate whether personal beliefs about seeking help, perception of others’ beliefs about seeking help, perceptions of own abilities in overcoming difficulties, level of social support, and severity of the symptoms of anxiety and depression affect intentions to seek help. 

Voice members contribution is important for developing their understanding of help-seeking for perinatal mental illness. The findings from this study can inform initiatives to enhance access to perinatal mental health treatments, specifically among women and birthing people living in the UK who belong to a minoritised ethnic group.

Volunteer Criteria

  • Aged 18+
  • Be pregnant or have given birth in the last 12 months
  • From a minoritised ethnic group. Minoritised ethnic groups consist of anyone that is not White British; this includes, Asian or Asian British, Black, Black British, Caribbean or African, Mixed or multiple ethnic groups, Arab, White Other (e.g., American/Australian and anyone of European descent) and any other ethnic groups. Gypsy, Roma and Irish groups who live in the UK are also classed as ethnic minorities.
  • Living in the UK (includes permanent or temporary)

What will I be asked to do?

Participants will be asked to complete a survey, which should take approximately 30 minutes to complete, on any appropriate technological device, such as: smart phone, tablet or computer. 

The survey will consist of questions regarding socio-demographic information (e.g., age, education), intentions to seek help, attitudes, beliefs about seeking help, social support and symptoms of anxiety and depression. 

When and where?

Online up until the 30th June.

Will I get anything for taking part?

Participants can win a £50 Amazon gift voucher.

If you would like to enter the prize draw, they will be asked to provide their email address upon completion of the survey. 

You will also be asked to share the link to the survey to anyone you know who meets the eligibility criteria. The more people you recruit, the higher the chance of winning a £50 Amazon gift voucher (two available). 

Newcastle University

Owners

Taking Part

Sorry, this opportunity is closed and you can no longer apply to take part

Predictors of help-seeking intentions for mental illness symptoms among minority-UK mothers Discussion

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Ianeon

Ianeon

30th May 2022

From the AIM of this Opportunity use "birthing people - not women."

Then surely this erases women and mothers as a category of identity?

Freedom gives you the right to be who you wish (identify) - but only people who are born as a female can give birth(women).

So....... Why do we need "birthing people."?

https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2021/09/pregnant-people-gender-identity/620031/

https://indianexpress.com/article/explained/explained-history-of-and-uproar-around-us-budget-document-using-birthing-people-instead-of-mothers-7351523/


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irenejoy

irenejoy

30th May 2022

Thank you for your comment. Our intention of using gender-neutral language was to be more inclusive of everyone who might experience pregnancy. However, we appreciate your feedback and we apologise for any offence that this may have caused. 

Thank you, 
Irene 

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Ianeon

Ianeon

31st May 2022

Hello - Thank you for your prompt reply, but NO I am not offended - I just do not understand.

I am just an old man who has difficulty understanding some aspects of modern-day life.

I Googled "gender-neutral" (https://eige.europa.eu/thesaurus/terms/1190) and came up with this definition:

The term ‘gender-neutral’ means that something is not associated with either women or men. It may refer to various aspects such as concepts or style of language. However, what is often perceived to be gender-neutral, including in areas of statistics or dissemination of data collected in reference to a population, often reflects gender blindness in practice (a failure to recognise gender specificities).

I can grasp the understanding if it applies to something such as employment, but not something as definitive as giving birth - although I do believe that there are species of animals which can change sex or have no gender.

Thank you.

 

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