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British Heart Foundation SENIOR-RITA Trial

Coronary artery disease (CAD), also known as ischemic heart disease, is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. CAD develops because of the build-up of fatty deposits (plaque) on the walls of the coronary arteries (the arteries that supply the heart with oxygen-rich blood), leading to a range of problems, including heart attack and angina (chest pain).

Over recent years, there have been improvements in medications and technologies to treat CAD but these have been primarily tested in younger patients. Previous studies suggest that older patients (75 years and over) are not well represented in clinical research and these patients, in particular those that are frail and those suffering from other conditions, are less likely to receive advanced medications and medical procedures.

The British Heart Foundation older patients with non-ST SEgmeNt elevatIOn myocaRdial infarction Randomized Interventional TreAtment Trial (SENIOR-RITA)

SENIOR-RITA is a non CTIMP (Clinical Trial of an Investigational Medicinal Product), interventional study funded by the British Heart Foundation looking at patients 75 and over presenting with Type 1 Non Segment Myocardial Infaction (NSTEMI).

This study will look at patients over the age of 75 who have come to hospital after having a heart attack. The aim of this study is to find out whether undergoing a procedure called an angiography (which shows whether there are any blockages in the heart arteries) as well as the latest medications recommended in heart attack is more effective treatment strategy than medication alone in terms of prolonging life.

This video contains important messages for improving recruitment into the BHF SENIOR-RITA trial. Highlighted in the video are; the significance of the trial, ways to explain the trial to the patients, nurse consent, and a participant’s perspective.

For more information about the trial, please click here.

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