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The future of joint replacement surgery and research

A BIG THANK YOU!

To patients, the public and musculoskeletal staff for their commitment to delivering research.

Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has topped the national league for the volume of clinical research carried out for the seventh consecutive year.

This amazing achievement would not be possible without the support of the clinical staff and the involvement of patients and members of the public.

A celebratory NHS70 engagement event was planned and facilitated by the Orthopaedic Research Team in collaboration with members of the Public Involvement in Musculoskeletal Services (PIMS) group to raise awareness of the musculoskeletal research that takes place and its impact on clinical care at the Freeman Hospital.

PIMS is a public involvement group where members of the public work with clinicians, academics and research staff to develop and carry out musculoskeletal research. The group provides feedback on research proposals, develops research material, and also offers on-going advice as members of a project steering groups.

The celebration started with a drop in session to thank the clinical staff for their involvement and commitment to helping to deliver musculoskeletal research at the Freeman Hospital.  The research team and members of the PIMS group showcased a range research studies and discussed the role of public involvement in the development and management of research.

Clinical Research Network (CRN), Nurse Midwives and Allied Health Professional (NMAHP) leads and the Research Design Service (RDS) representatives provided advice to staff on the opportunities to get involved in research and the support available to NMAHP’s in Newcastle.  

Around 40 members of staff from the wards, outpatient clinics and therapy services were able to attend the session and feedback highlighted the enthusiasm for clinical staff to engage more in research activity!

The public engagement event took place in the evening and consisted of a series of workshops and presentations for patients and the public to demonstrate the large range of research and education activity that takes place at the Freeman Hospital and its impact on the clinical care provided.

An interactive workshop delivered by Stryker demonstrated how research has led to changes in the design and materials used in hip and knee replacements.

Tours of the state-of-the-art Newcastle Surgical Training Centre gave an insight into the advanced surgical training using cadavers and pioneering research into new technologies that takes place at the Freeman Hospital. Attendees even got the chance to have a try using the Da Vinci - the latest technology in robotic surgery!

Presentations from Mr James Holland and Professor David Deehan highlighted the impact of orthopaedic research on the clinical care provided at the Freeman Hospital, new developments in joint replacement surgery and the future of robotic surgery technology in hip and knee replacement surgery.

The patient experience team discussed the recent patient feedback from the relevant musculoskeletal services at the Freeman and facilitated a ‘What Matters to You’ session to identify patient’s priorities for future development.

On behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Department we would like to thank;

  • The Musculoskeletal Directorate and the Clinical Academic Unit for funding the event.
  • The Newcastle Surgical Training Centre for the tours and Stryker for the implant demonstration.
  • Alex Rodger(CRN),  Jo Lally (RDS), Lisa Robinson (NMAHP), Tracy Scott and Caroline McGarry (Patient experience).
  • Mr James Holland and Professor David Deehan for the presentations and Q&A session.
  • And finally the PIMS members for facilitating the event.

If you know anyone who would be interested in getting involved in research with the PIMS group please contact Heidi McColm on Heidi.McColm@nuth.nhs.uk or contact the orthopaedic research department on 0191 2231514 for more information.

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